Book Reviews

Review Rating Scale:

POOR – AVERAGE – FAIR – GOOD – VERY GOOD – EXCELLENT

Arranged alphabetically by author’s last name

Rarely have I read books in the romance genre that deal with such issues as mental illness, self-love, even poetry. But there are always exceptions to the rule. Such was it with C.B. Gabriel’s Trey & Kate, a contemporary romance that focused more on the reality of relationships and life than it did romance. This book is written in a completely different style than what you would expect from a romance novel which is why I would tentatively place this book in a cross-genre category: literary fiction and romance.

1. Thoughts on the plot

There are a few things you can expect from a romance novel. One is that there will be romance. Two is that the road to getting there will be difficult, with many ups and downs. This book was no exception, however it did not follow the formula that is often standard for the romance genre. Instead of figuring out life’s ups and downs together, the two main characters were apart more often than they were together. They were figuring out how to deal with their own demons. yes, they pined for the other, but it was learning to deal with their own emotions and traumas that was centre stage. This made for a completely different sort of romance than what I had expected. It was far more realistic and therefore more like literary fiction than otherwise.

2. Thoughts on the main character

These two main characters, Trey and Kate, are extremely realistic; they are messed up individuals with problems that just about anyone can relate to. They have both been burned in the past and it is difficult for them to trust. I can appreciate that this story does its best to be realistic, but I think I would have liked these two to perhaps be a bit more consistent in their journey. They jump around from problem to problem—trust issues to mental illness to dealing with the problems from the past to addiction—without every really solving or conquering one first. This makes them feel a little too much like characters who would perhaps belong in a series rather than a single book, wherein they focus on one primary problem rather than several. Again, though, this fits with the style of realism and so does make sense with the rest of the story. I just, personally, like a little more consistency and linear progression.

3. Favourite part

One of the things that is rarely seen in a romance (though I have seen it more frequently in the last couple of years than otherwise) is the focus on self-love before romantic love. This book manages to make self-love and self-acceptance an extremely important factor. Actually, much of Trey and Kate’s journey is to do with learning to accept themselves and their issues before they can commit to a relationship with each other. I really liked this idea, because it emphasises something which I consider to be really important. You can’t look to another person to make you happy; that comes from within.

4. Critique

My only real critique for this book is to do with the style of writing. This book uses metaphor quite heavily as a means for these characters to both relate to each other and to understand life. That in itself is fine, but the regular interactions that often flesh out a character and make them so interesting are then ignored to be almost non-existent. There is a lot of information that seems to be missing and when coupled with the heavy use of metaphor, this book reads more like poetry than it does a coherent story. Granted, that fits the genre-mash that I mentioned earlier, however it does make the coherence of this story a bit rough. The characters are also a little bit more difficult to get to know because a good number of people do not communicate or think primarily in metaphor and the lack of average interactions makes them feel a little stiff.

Overall, I would say that this book was definitely not what I expected from a romance. It deals more with the issues that one might face in real life. It examines the concept of self-love and it puts the characters through a number of scenarios that you would not typically see in a romance novel. For this reason, I add the classification of literary fiction. I would say that given these things, this book is GOOD.

The advancement of technology can bring about many wonderful things. However, these potentially world-changing advancements are often supported by people who care about power more than they care about helping people or making the world a better place. In Enigma’s Virus by Gary Paul Garrett, the intertwining of politics and power-hungre individuals with technological research brings about problems that could very well change the world as we know it… and not for the better. Only a few people stand in the way of this destruction and they have to use their own technology to stop these terrible events.

1. Thoughts on the plot

This book reads a little like science fiction meets techno-thriller. It has all the elements of a thriller—replete with secrets that the government is keeping, as well as people who are surprisingly well-equipped to stop them—and the technical pieces of a book focused more on technology and its effects than anything. Overall, the plot is fairly standard, which does not mean that it is uninteresting. In fact, I found the plot itself to be one of the best features of the book.

2. Thoughts on the main character

There are many characters in this book, which makes it rather difficult to determine which one is the main character. I believe that Keith or Tim are the two that I would nominate for the position and they are both likeable and extremely capable. However, I think this can be a little problematic, as they are often facing the same situations and sometimes deal with them in the exact same way. This makes things like individuality a little difficult to determine since the character responses are so similar. They are very unique in their connections to other characters, though, so that makes them quite distinct.

3. Favourite part

My favourite piece of this book is probably a tie with the technical pieces (because who doesn’t love science) and the relationship that develops between Keith and Allie (incidentally the daughter of our villain). I think that lends this book a little bit of the human aspect which otherwise is a little flat in this book. Other characters have relationships and close connections with other characters, but none of them feel very deep or memorable compared to the one between Keith and Allie.

4. Critique

I think there are a few larger problems with this book. One is that the prose itself is a little difficult to follow. Events happen that make sense, then the next paragraph has more events that came out of nowhere. It feels almost like a jump in logical sequence with the story. Another critique is that there are certain plot holes that were not filled and make the credibility of this story hard to swallow. One such example is the Presidential security being almost non-existent, allowing certain events to happen when otherwise they wouldn’t. My main critique, though, is that the villain, who sets the events in the book in motion, feels like nothing more than a garden variety pervert. He does not seem capable enough to do most of the things that are attributed to him. He just seems like a person with anger issues who could not have possibly gotten to where he is without someone else pulling the strings. The other question with this villain is…why? Why is he so interested in this technology? Why did he invest in it? What’s the purpose? All of that seems to be missing. Unfortunately, with the villain being so difficult to believe, that makes the rest of the story equally difficult to swallow because none of the characters would be in that situation if the villain made logical sense with the description given.

Overall, I liked the plot and the main characters. This book feels like a standard techno-thriller/science fiction piece that you would find at your bookstore. But, with the unbelievability of the villain and his motivations, I would have to say that this book sits between AVERAGE and FAIR.

Jane Austen’s works have been a must read in the world of romance for years. Somehow, she managed to capture the essence of people in books whose plots have little more than families living out their lives. Still, they have captured the hearts of many readers. So when Florence Gold took some of the concepts of Jane Austen’s works and applied them to the time of World War I, I was intrigued. And, as it turns out,  Elizabeth and Darcy was very interesting. It explores the history of Jane Austen in all her glory and criticisms, while also exploring the love story that exists separately—or perhaps not so separately—from Austen’s works.

1. Thoughts on the plot

This plot centres on Elizabeth Jane Austen, the original Jane Austen’s grandniece. She is a lecturer at Oxford in 1916 and must work with Nevin Darcy Lancashire, a Captain sent home from the front due to injury, in order to write a forward to the new printings of Jane Austen’s works. While trying to convince Nevin of the merits of Jane Austen’s works, Elizabeth must also explore her own mind and heart. This plot is actually quite interesting in that it combines an overview of the history and analysis of Jane Austen’s pieces while also investing in the lives of their “modern” counterparts. Some of the characters mimic those in Austen’s books, as do some of the situations. But there is much more that goes on in this story, which is evident of how we have both changed and stayed the same from the time of Austen. In a nutshell, I quite liked the plot and found it very fun, with enough seriousness to be able to become thoroughly engrossed.

2. Thoughts on the main character

I would say that Elizabeth in Gold’s book mirrors the Elizabeth in Austen’s, only she is more self-aware. I do not know if this ability to introspect comes from the situation—an Oxford education and a job—or the history—1916, right in the middle of one of the most devastating wars in all of history—but it is fascinating to read. She is obviously capable and yet has enough insecurities that the reader can relate to her. It was quite entertaining to watch her go through the romance with Nevin—or I should say, Darcy. Their relationship was character-enhancing and also quite charming. I think there were bits where Elizabeth was incredibly stubborn or foolish, but on the whole I liked her quite a lot.

3. Favourite part

That is a difficult one. Possibly the confrontation between the Duchess of Lancashire and Elizabeth and her Darcy. That was quite entertaining. I can say no more, because of spoilers, but I shall say that it is reminiscent of a certain scene in Pride and Prejudice.

4. Critique

This was such a good book, a combination of history and literary analysis and romance, that it is difficult to want to critique this book. But there was one bit where things just sort of fell apart and that bit was the ending. The story was moving along very well, and then everything just sort of stopped. Yes, it was a strategic point of ending. Yes, there was history to consider. But even one more interaction between Elizabeth and Darcy would have been enough to tie this up extremely well instead of just sort of dropping you off the edge of a cliff. It was such a shame, because the rest of the book was wonderful.

Given that this book was, overall, extremely well written and researched, with all the fascination a good story and characters can bring, I would like to say that this book is excellent. However, the ending did sort of jar me enough that I shall say, instead, that it was VERY GOOD.

In some stories within the fantasy genre—including all the grimdark, horror, epic, adventure, and otherwise—there are beings that are as old as the world. Usually these beings are gods, or monsters. In Brent Kelley’s work, Chuggie and the Desecration of Stagwater, the main character is one of these beings. And he manifests as a drunk, more-than-slightly sarcastic person with a chain and anchor protruding from his ribs. Chuggie is the manifestation of Drought and he is, unknowingly, about to enter into a series of events that is going to change the lives of a good number of people and also cause a whole lot of trouble.

1. Thoughts on the plot

There is a lot going on in this book, which is actually quite nice. There are so many different elements that all exist separately and yet come together to make the whole. For people like me who enjoy a well-woven story just as much as puzzles, this is a really good combination. The way that Chuggie interacts with the world seems to be a haphazard and drunken staggering from plot point to plot point. The characters around Chuggie have their own intent, their own mechanisms, their own motivations, and yet everything that Chuggie does expands upon and renders moot all that these characters do. Basically, this world has no idea what hit it. The way that this is explored is really well done on the author’s part. It is a difficult feat to manage to make everything come together under the attentions of a character who seems completely blown about by chance. And also quite impressive.

2. Thoughts on the main character

For as much as Chuggie seems to be a drunken wanderer who has no real intent beyond living his life and enjoying it, he is actually a very complicated and interesting character. It is sometimes hard to relate to these incomprehensibly old and powerful beings in stories, simply because their experience is so far beyond our own. With Chuggie, however, he seems to be a perfectly ordinary guy. Well, except for the super old bit. And the embodiment of Drought bit. But everything else is just a result of Chuggie trying to eke out a decent life and encountering rather dangerous and unfortunate situations along the way. The really entertaining part, though, is the way that all of the other characters seem to underestimate him. He may act like an ordinary guy, but he really isn’t. And honestly, it’s more than a bit amusing to see the other people floundering when they realise their mistake.

3. Favourite part

There are so many pieces of this book that I enjoyed that it’s really hard to pick a favourite part. Is it the bit where we’re introduced to Chuggie and he’s stuck in a tree? Or the bit where he impulsively runs off to go fetch a goat-faced purse to save his trapped love? Or the part where the other characters finally realise what idiots they’ve been? I don’t know. So I shall instead say that my favourite part was the fact that everyone is going around riding goats like horses and pretending that it’s completely normal. Every time I read that, I had to fight from laughing out loud and scaring my cat. Even in dire circumstances.

4. Critique

I think out of everything, I had a hard time with the ending. This book does such a spectacular set-up and building of the dark-possibly-horrific world that we find ourselves in. There is so much going on that comes together so nicely. The bits that push this book into the horror category are really well described and quite vivid. So when everything ends so abruptly, it felt a little strange. Okay, yes, the ending does make perfect sense. And, yes, there is a book two that will (hopefully) answer all the remaining questions. But it felt a little like everything just stopped. It was a little like being yanked out of the story by a string of strangely spelt words (this didn’t happen, but for a linguist, this is the best parallel I’ve got).

Overall, though, and even disregarding the ending, I would say that this book is very well written, well thought out, and well done. The characters were interesting (if a touch grotesque in parts, which is to be expected), the plot was entertaining and the whole goat situation… Anyways, I would say that this book was VERY GOOD.

I read a lot of fantasy. It so happens that I really like all varieties of fantasy (and almost every genre) but there are some that just make you sink back with the biggest cup of tea you can find and smile. In this particular instance, the book was Shattered Dreams by Ulff Lehmann, a book that combines epic fantasy with some of the more fiddly aspects of detailed oriented historical fiction, as well as a touch of the grimdark to spice things up. This book, I shall tell you with great delight, is what I imagine a literary chess game to be. It has strategy, threads woven together, forethought, false directions, intrigue, and that wonderful fascination that puzzles invariably provide.

1. Thoughts on the plot

This plot is definitely one that is not simple. Some epic fantasy stories will follow a character or a group of characters on a quest. Some follow more intricate details that move through various characters’ lives and create a world, fully formed, fully fledged, stunning. This book does that. There are definitely a few things to follow: Danaster is being invaded by its neighbour, Chanastardh. The Danasterians would agree that this is a problem. Therefore, some of the people in Danaster, namely a holy warrior, a slightly-befuddled wizardess, and a few other people who are smarter than you might think, have decided that perhaps they should do something about this. Naturally, there are other forces at work. Ones from the long past. And they’re bringing other people into play.

The plot is expertly woven together, with details about the actually-terribly-important history of the world that I found fascinating. Often, epic fantasies rarely manage to get the history involved in a truly realistic manner. Or, they give you an info-dump at the very beginning disguised as a prologue. This plot involves the history in careful remarks, chance phrases, and an elf perhaps screaming too loudly about such matters.

Again, this is like a chess game, only with death being the result if you lose a piece.

2. Thoughts on the main character

There are a few really important characters in this book, but I shall focus on two: Drangar and Kildanor.

Drangar is a man fleeing his past. His very mysterious past. We first meet him in the isolated backwaters and he is invariably mysterious and interesting. This is a potent combination, which usually—in epic fantasy, as well as other genres—means there is a tragic backstory. This tragic backstory, though, is actually rather central to the plot and does more than just develop Drangar’s character. To be fair, it does that, too. Drangar tries to flee, but the past has claws and does not so easily let go. In facing it, he becomes a key upon which events turn.

Kildanor, on the other hand, is fully aware that he is significant. This is not arrogance, but experience. He is one of an order of holy warriors, belonging to a religion that current times have done their best to ban. (It hasn’t worked all that well, as these things go.) Kildanor has power and he has the influence to wield it. So, he does. All in the name of his god, Lesganagh, god of Sun and War. But there are other dangerous forces afoot, some of which haven’t been seen since one of the last wars and hoped to have been locked away forever.

The characters in this book read like wildly interesting and realistic people. They have quirks and fears. They joke with their friends. And they both shape and are shaped by the world around them. These are really well done characters, ones I enjoyed reading almost as much as I enjoyed the situations in which they found themselves.

3. Favourite part

There was a bit where things caught fire and people were complaining by means of axe-strike. That was definitely my favourite bit.

4. Critique

My critique for this book has very little to do with the book and more with my inability to read a map. It took me a few chapters to figure out who was fighting whom and which side everyone was on. However, it was all made completely clear once I looked again at the map so helpfully provided at the front of the book. Otherwise, I really have no major critiques. Just the knowledge that I am directionally challenged and geographically incompetent. C’est la vie.

Overall, I would say that I have not read a book of this depth and detail and thought for a while. Sometimes I read to melt my brain and clear the synapses. But most of the time, I like to think and to be invited to think. This book definitely did that and I am glad for it. I could probably read this book over and over and still enjoy unravelling it. I would therefore say that this book was EXCELLENT.

Death does not always mean the end. Certainly not in fantasy stories. But what if all of the ideas that you had about what went on after the grave were, well, somewhat mistaken? The Last Soul by Jonathon Lively is book one in the Oreniah Codex, an exploration of one soul’s journey through what comes next, but also how to get back.

1. Thoughts on the plot

The initial chapter, dealing with the cat soul Ches, led me to be extremely intrigued in what was going on. When we then encounter the main character, Lathan, I was thrilled to be able to see how he was going to interact with Ches and all the intricacies of Oreniah. Lathan’s life, though, does take a while to examine. Yes, it is important because it describes his relationships and his reason for wanting to get back—and therefore undergoing all the things he undergoes while on Oreniah—but it does take a while to get into. I found myself a little confused by how ordinary Lathan’s life was. However, this does change after a bit. We are introduced to some of the oddities which lead to his death. Then, things really start to pick up.

I would say that this plot may start off slowly (excepting the introduction with Ches) but it definitely does not continue that way. There is a lot going on in Lathan’s life after he, well, dies. And objectively, it may seem like simple things, but it is also so much more than that. Once this plot starts really going, it really goes.

2. Thoughts on the main character

At first, Lathan seems, I have to admit, like a bit of a bumbling fool. He is obviously in love with his family and he really enjoys his life. He does seem to be a bit oblivious to some things, though, and that really shows in his relationship with his wife, Tara. However, when push comes to shove, Lathan is a definite hero. He has a firm sense of right and wrong. He will do as much as he can to help those he cares about. He listens and tries to understand.

Also, his soul—and related abilities—is pretty awesome. Controlling the air? Very cool!

3. Favourite part

My favourite part would probably be the bit near the end where Lathan and Justice finally get to whollop their opponents and see what sort of team they can be. I can, unfortunately, give you no more than that because of spoilers, but believe me when I say that it is not only a great character building moment, but it is also just an epic throw down.

What can I say? Sometimes I like the bits where they just hit stuff. It’s therapeutic.

4. Critique

My biggest critique is probably to do with the worldbuilding. That is to say, the world of Oreniah and all its lore is extremely interesting and very cool. However, the way that this world is described overwhelms the story a bit.

A lot of the scenes that are pivotal to character development or plot development or just a really big fight are interspersed with huge amounts of description. This means that the world itself is very clear, but it can also be a bit too much. For example, there were a couple of fight scenes where I had to go back and re-read a good deal of the action because every movement and detail was depicted. This made it hard to imagine in my head because what might have felt natural for me to imagine was not what was depicted. This isn’t to say that what was depicted was wrong or off, just that it was a little too much. This also happened a few times with simple descriptions of scenes. There were just too many details and it overwhelmed what was actually happening with the characters themselves.

On the whole, though, I thought this book was really very interesting. The story was unique. The characters were well written and very interesting. I think they will continue to expand and grow in subsequent books and that will be a great journey. The action sequences are done on an epic scale and that is highly entertaining to read. So, even with the world itself being perhaps a bit too much for the characters and the action, I would say that this book was definitely fun to read. I would say that it is GOOD, bordering on VERY GOOD.

Dragon’s Trail by Joseph Malik is a fantasy techno-thriller, which is to say it is a mash of two genres that rarely get seen together. The magical nature of fantasy—with elves and men riding about on horses, wielding swords—combined with the detail-oriented techno-thriller, which uses technology to solve whatever horrid problem is facing the main character and the world that particular day. This story follows two people from Earth: Jarrod, a former fencing and martial-arts master who now works as a stuntman; and Carter, a former linebacker who has a penchant for medieval style fighting. These two are summoned to Gateskeep, where they are tasked with getting the army up to snuff in order to combat a sorcerer named Ulo. Jarrod and Carter do this, only they bring some of the might and knowledge of Earth with them. The result? A fantasy with huge amounts of actual information on fighting and strategy, where the characters have an advantage and are still faced with struggles, and where the major conflict hinges on bringing a gun to a knife fight, relatively speaking.

1. Thoughts on the plot

If you look at this story from the surface level, the plot is a fairly typical portal-fantasy novel. A person—usually from Earth—is brought in, accidentally or otherwise, to solve a massive problem facing some fantasy realm. This person applies their Earther knowledge and faces the fantastical challenges with great aplomb. Or, at least, a whole lot of style. If you zoom in to the plot, this story is a whole lot more complex than the typical fantasy, portal or otherwise. There is strategy behind the decisions that characters make on either side. The things that you would expect to be so are not quite what they appear. And the characters from Earth are indeed quite capable and do have great style and aplomb (I’m looking at you, Carter, with that massive suit of armour) but face actual challenges from all quarters.

Then, there are the technical details that make this a techno-thriller. Technology is central to any society. This book explores the technology of the time and does so in such detail that you know precisely that it matters. A lot. And, as it turns out, the technology does matter. A lot. These details, combined with the strategy of a grand-scale fantasy, make this plot one of the more interesting and complex ones that I have seen in a while.

2. Thoughts on the main character

Jarrod is the primary main character here, though Carter plays a rather significant role. Initially, he seems a bit arrogant and probably mad at the world. However, it is soon shown that he actually knows what he is doing and asks rational questions. Okay, yes, he is still arrogant, but there is reason.

The interesting part is watching Jarrod’s development as he explores the world surrounding Gateskeep. He doesn’t change quite so dramatically as some characters do in fantasy novels, but it is definitely there. The arrogance, though, doesn’t ever really go away. Frankly, I’m okay with that. It makes him an entertaining character and I enjoy the snark a fair bit.

3. Favourite part

Well, I’m a linguist. I shall say, then, that my favourite part of the book started with the discussion of the phonetic attributes of the word gbatu and continued with the various descriptions of the language-learning process. I liked all the technical pieces, too, but honestly, language. What’s not to like?

4. Critique

If I had a critique for this book, it would be one of two things. I would say that Jarrod and Carter seem to make mincemeat of their challenges. The odds are stacked in their favour, for obvious reasons. However, since that is rather the point of the book and the challenges are, well, actually challenging, I would say just sit back and enjoy the technology. Even if you have to look up some of the terms.

The other critique I have is that the map at the back of the book is rather unhelpful for people like me who need a map constantly.

Basically, the few critiques I had were more or less irrelevant.

My overall rating for this book is definitely EXCELLENT, which tops the scale. A good way to start the year, no? Now, on to book two, where I imagine things are going to get rather worse for our characters. This should be quite entertaining.

I have never reviewed a children’s book before, because honestly they are so amazingly difficult to create that I was always a bit wary. You wouldn’t think that children’s books would be difficult, but children see the world in such a way that we adults often have a difficult time relating. And as an adult, reviewing a book meant for someone with a far more open and flexible mind is something that is quite difficult. That being said, I am going to give it a go, starting with Katie Lynn Melko’s Paw Elementary: Roxy’s Adventure to the School Dentist.

Usually, in a picture book, the part of the story that grabs me are the pictures. These have to tell the story to someone who can’t read (or is just starting out) and is having someone read to them. These pictures have to match up with the story well enough that you can tell what’s going on without the words. And you have to have enough interest that the child doesn’t get bored. These pictures do very well with that. The expressions reflect the emotions that the characters should be feeling (even with the stylistic features of a cartoon dog and friends). There is enough to interest a child in the scene. I think the bits with the dental tools might require some help with the words, but half the time I have no idea what the dentist is doing anyways, so that’s something to consider.

As for the actual story itself, the concept is a good one. The idea is to make a trip to the dentist less scary for children. It is a bit frightening when someone shoves pointy objects into your mouth and expects you to hold a conversation. This does well at explaining what a dentist is doing to children. However, it does forget the bit about ‘what if you actually have a cavity and they have to drill your tooth out’. (I do understand this, though, because that is not a fun experience and you probably shouldn’t include such things in a children’s book.) On the whole, I think it does well in making the dentist a more understandable thing, while also talking about the importance of brushing your teeth properly.

I think that if I have a critique for this book, it would be in the placement of the text. Yes, the picture is the most important part, but the text is very cramped and close together, and if a child is trying to read along, the words are going to be difficult to pick apart. Making the words just a touch bigger and maybe changing the colour to be slightly lighter would be helpful. 

On the whole, I like this book. I think it does well with making a potentially scary situation less frightening. And teaching children is one of the main points of children’s books. 

Imagine you’ve woken up in an unfamiliar place. Not jut an unfamiliar place, but an unfamiliar body and an unfamiliar life. You then discover that this is intentional. You have been brought to this place to solve a crime. There are eight chances. Eight bodies. And if you don’t solve the mystery, then you shall have to start over from the beginning, with no memory. Here’s the rub, though. You’re not the only one trying to solve the mystery. Stuart Turton’s The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle is a mystery novel that is something like a combination of Agatha Christie, Quantum Leap and it is stunning to read.

1. Thoughts on the plot

There is a lot going on with this plot. Not only do you have several main characters—well, only one main character, but the body jumping adds eight more to that—but you have several supporting characters, including the suspects. Included in this complex web are the events of the day that lead up to the murder of Evelyn Hardcastle, some of which make absolutely no sense, some of which seem like one thing and then become another. The plot clears up a touch as you move along, but this is definitely not something you can casually read. As a lover of mystery, I thought the plot was absolutely wonderful and really well thought out. I can only imagine the storyboarding involved in trying to keep everything straight.

2. Thoughts on the main character

Our main character, Aiden Bishop, is not an easy person to suss out. Part of the problem is that his personality often clashes or is overwhelmed by the personality of his host body. This makes for a very interesting read, as it is quite difficult to determine what parts are those of Aiden Bishop and what parts are those of the people whose lives he’s borrowed. Despite this complexity, I find that I really like Bishop. He is a character who doesn’t know why he’s been thrown into this horrid situation, but still manages to do his best to stop it. Not because solving the mystery brings his freedom from the terrible place, but because he seems to genuinely care about what is going on and about the people involved. Bishop is a likeable character, which is very interesting, since many of his hosts are not at all likeable. The way their personalities overlay Bishop’s and the way their lives cause the drama to play out is nothing short of artful.

3. Favourite part

This book was filled with so many interesting twists and turns that it’s not really possible for me to narrow it down to a single favourite part. I liked seeing the mystery being pulled together with the various threads. I think the part where we realised that things could be changed was extremely significant and the reactions of all involved probably made that one of the most noticeable for me. Though, I should have to say that I liked the whole book. There was no one favourite part.

4. Critique

I think the revelation about the, ah, circumstances that put Bishop into this realm of mystery (sorry, cannot say more for spoilers) was a bit underdeveloped. This is significant—hugely so—and it feels almost like an afterthought in the light of the mystery. Don’t get me wrong, I love mystery. I think that this book could have been nothing other than what it was, but I would have liked to have known more about this particular… situation.

Overall, I would say that The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle was an extremely well-done mystery novel. The premise was unique, the characters were interesting and I devoured this book within a very short amount of time. It was not at all what I would have expected and I’m thankful for that. I think that this book is definitely EXCELLENT.

Thriller novels, where the world is threatened by something terrible, be it virus or bomb, and must be stopped by means of a couple very capable but under appreciated characters, rarely involve dolphins. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve read a fair number of science fiction novels, so the application of dolphins to world-saving efforts is not unheard of (Douglas Adams, anyone?) but a thriller novel is something else entirely. So when I started reading John C Waite’s The Turpsios Syndrome, I was a bit surprised to learn that it involved actual dolphins. Except for that surprising piece of science fiction, this book is a contemporary thriller novel through and through, from the lawman trying to start a new life to the cop who is tired of being seen only as an attractive woman. Oh, and the world-threatening situation.

1. Thoughts on the plot

As far as plot goes, this particular novel did not deviate from the standards of the thriller genre. This made it fairly predictable, but not necessarily in a bad way. It is always good to know that the heros of our story—Hickory and Kevin—will triumph and that we average citizens will not end up dying by terrible means—in this instance, a nuclear bomb. I also think this familiarity helped smooth over some of the unusual nature that the focus on dolphins brought. That particular piece of science could very well be accurate (and, the science did check out as far as I can tell) but it was a little startling. However, when placed in conjunction with the adventure that Hickory and Kevin were on, it became an interesting piece of tech utilised in conjunction with our heros’ smarts and abilities to solve the immediate problem. That is, death.

2. Thoughts on the main character

This book follows a few main characters, but I am going to name Kevin and Hickory as our two primary main characters. Kevin is a former FBI agent turned National Parks Ranger after the tragic death of his wife. Hickory is an attractive woman who finds herself underestimated in her calling as a cop. These two meet up when Hickory finds a dying dolphin on the beach and calls in Kevin for help. They becoming increasingly entangled in terrible events and each other from there.

As far as characters go, I would have to say that neither Kevin nor Hickory is terribly spectacular. They follow the mold that has been created for them in many other thriller stories, being both disillusioned and capable, as well as dangerous and slightly-more-attractive-than-normal. This lack of uniqueness made them fit right in to the familiar thriller guidelines that we also get with the plot. However, I do not necessarily think that their manifestation as precisely what you would expect is a bad thing. It fits in with the plot and makes it easy to read, integrating you right into the story without much effort.

3. Favourite part

My favourite part is actually the main characters, Kevin and Hickory. They really did fit right in to the story and made reading it very smooth. There was no disjointedness with these characters; they flowed well and they did not defy my expectations. They were a great pleasure to read.

4. Critique

My least favourite part is also to do with a character, this time the doctor who makes the dolphins so important. Dr. Crabtree is definitely the odd-man-out in this book. He is written to be sensational and shocking in that his emotions for the dolphins borders on creepy (though it never crosses the line). And honestly, it doesn’t fit. If this book were perhaps more psychological than action-oriented, that would fit better. But as it stands, he is a character whose psychological motivations do not line up with the rest of the novel. For someone so smart, he misses a whole lot of extremely obvious points. And he is just a bit too creepy to fit into this novel of greedy villains and righteous villains. He soured me on the whole concept of the dolphins and their scientific benefit; taken alone, that would have been really fascinating. But taken with him, it was just strange.

Overall, I think this book is a good example of a contemporary thriller. It has all the elements you would expect and enough action to paint a clear picture (explosions included) in your mind. Excepting the piece with the dolphins, which loses its fascination due to their keeper, this piece is a good read for an afternoon when all is rainy and dull. I would rate this book as GOOD.

Short stories are a completely different form factor than novels. They try to tell a lasting story without having several hundred pages in which to do it. The best short stories create compelling characters, interesting plot points and memorable reactions with just a few words. Writing such a thing can be incredibly difficult, though, so when you find a good short story, take note. John C Waite’s collection of short stories, Beauty and the Singularity has a mix of short stories, which had an interesting take on many different thoughts.

I am not entirely sure on the theme for this collection of short stories. They seemed to all favour contemporary settings, with a few focusing more on thriller-esque ideas, and others on more human emotions and problems. This slight disparity in theme, though, worked well for this collection because you were not quite sure what to expect with each story. That was a compelling reason to keep reading.

Most of the stories were ones that I did not particularly care for, and part of that is just that they didn’t have a lasting effect on me or stir any great emotions in me. That is one of the harder parts of writing a short story—especially collections of short stories—is that they have to all be compelling. These were interesting, but not necessarily compelling. However, the signature piece in this collection, to do with a beautiful woman found in a coffin just when history seems to be repeating, was very good. It was interesting in its plot points; it kept me guessing and wondering until the very end. The characters were unique individuals that had the potential, I think, to be a whole story in of themselves. And the writing was fluid and smooth enough to keep me in the story. This story alone was so good that I could almost discount the lack of stirring emotion in the others.

There were two instances where I had to skip the story entirely. One was because I had read the story before, in a chapter in John Waite’s The Tursiops Syndrome, which I had previously read and reviewed. The other was because the formatting was so difficult and jarring that I couldn’t read but two paragraphs before having to give up. I would say that if such things as formatting errors don’t bother you, the story would potentially be good, but this formatting was a bit much for me.

On the whole, I would say that there were some gems in this collection and some average stories. This is much like what I would expect from a collection of short stories. The gems, though, were very good. However, for a collection to be taken as a whole, I would have to say that this collection was AVERAGE to FAIR.

In this modern time, people are often surrounded by social media. Taking pictures for Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, posting status updates on Twitter or Snapchat, these things are all normal activities for many people every day. It can be an empty feeling to be unconnected in the world of social media, but it can be just as pressure-filled to be always connected. Ideal Angels by Robert Welbourn explores the idea of connection in the age of social media. This book follows a whirlwind relationship between two characters as they navigate the ups and downs of living a life online. Ideal Angels is written in the second person and throws you right into the middle of one of the fastest weeks of your life.

1. Thoughts on the plot

The plot itself is fairly simple. Boy meets girl—probably the perfect girl—and they end up in a relationship. Said relationship moves quickly until life happens and then, well… spoilers. I would say that this familiar plot is actually a useful device, as the book takes a very, very close look at what goes on during this whirlwind week. Everything explored is a typical reaction or feeling and yet it is quite different seeing things on such a minute scale through the eyes of a character that is meant to be, as strange as it is, you.

2. Thoughts on the main character

It is a very strange thing to be told that you are the main character. Often people can relate to characters in books and they can see themselves participating in the plot, facing the problems, saving the day. However, when you are told that you are the one doing all of the action as opposed to just watching it, things become very strange. The main character makes questionable decisions. I know they’re questionable, you know they’re questionable, even he—you as he—knows they’re questionable. But suddenly everything feels different because it is not some person that you’re reading about making these decisions. You are making these decisions.

For me, this was a very bizarre sensation. I found it easier if I thought about myself as the narrator and the main character as someone I know and can picture in the situation. This made things easier and it was then possible for me to distance myself from the character enough to see the story rather than the moment.

3. Favourite part

I found the progression of the main character as the most fascinating part. He developed in a direction that I would not have expected. It was very interesting to see that progression in regards to you/myself as the main character. It was also interesting because the reader got to see every thought, every idea, every action, as the character saw and participated in the action. The imagery was vague, but the thoughts were clear. It was, frankly, very much like life. And to see that character progress in such a manner was extremely intimate and a little disconcerting. But fascinating.

4. Critique

This was one of the first times I’ve read a longer piece in second person perspective. I would have to say that it, combined with the longer, run-on sentences and the slightly disjointed progression of thought, made this book a little difficult to read. Reading Ideal Angels felt unlike any book I’ve read before (well, except some of the samysdat books from the twentieth century Russian authors). Instead, this felt very much like reading an avant garde piece of art. Which is to say, it was interesting, I understood it, but it was a little unsettling and bizarre. I imagine this is rather the point, but even so.

Overall, this book read a lot like an Albert Camus novel with a modern take on the world. It was a completely different artform from what I’m used to and it was fascinating and a little strange to see how it turned out. Still, the message was very clear and this is definitely a story that will stick with me for a while. I would rate this book as right between GOOD and VERY GOOD.

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